Centrifugal Pumps Section

The parts of centrifugal pumps is as follows, (1) casing, (2) blades, (3) inlet, (4) nozzles (diffuser) and a outlet. a. Casing (home conch) Its function is to change or convert fluid energy into static pressure energy. b. Blade Its function is to convert the kinetic energy or provide kinetic energy to the liquid, and then in the casing is ...

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Pump Energy Needs

a. Energy With our energy to work. In pumping energy required to lift water with a certain flow. Water energy is supplied by a pump that moves by human power or motors using solar energy, wind or fuel. Energy is usually measured in Watt-hours or watt-hour (Wh or Wjam). Because the value of 1 Wh is very small, the unit ...

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Understanding Irrigation Pumps

The pump is a type of machine that serves to move the substance flow (fluid) including piped water from one place to another by providing mechanical energy to the pump which is then converted into mechanical energy. Pump specifications stated with the amount of fluid that can flow per unit of time and the high-energy lift. In these functions the ...

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Working Principle Centrifugal Pumps

Centrifugal pumps are pumping the most widely used because it has a simple shape and a relatively cheap price. Here are some advantages of centrifugal pumps than other types of positive displacement pumps:  The movement of the blades are continuously causing steady flow.  High operating reliability due to the movement of the elements are simple and the absence ...

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Characteristic Curves Pump

Pump characteristic curve also called the performance curve, describes the relationship between capacity, head, power and efficiency of pump (Figure 9:17). Knowledge pump characteristic curve is required to select a pump on certain operational conditions that give high efficiency and low operating costs. Generally Head, input power and efficiency is structured as ordinate while the capacity as abscissa at a ...

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Designing Irrigation Channels and Networks

a. Determine the water level in the tap building High water levels in the tap building tertiary primary or secondary channel can be calculated by the following equation: P = A + a + b + c + d + e + f + g + h + z Where: P = water level in the primary or secondary channel ...

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